VABA Book & Ephemera Fair this Weekend! ~ April 2, 2016

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Vermont Antiquarian Booksellers Association Book & Ephemera Fair!

April 2, 2016, 10 am – 4 pm
Hilton Burlington, 60 Battery St., Burlington VT

This Saturday, come and visit 25+ booksellers as they display their most interesting books and ephemera! And what better place to go and find other folks that are as passionate about your interests as you are?

Antiquarian Booksellers from New England and the Northeast offering Scarce, Rare & Out of Print Books, both Antiquarian & Modern, Antique Maps & Prints, Postcards & Ephemera for sale

FREE Admission-  Please share with your friends and we hope to see you there!
For more information, email: books [at] TheEloquentPage [dot] com

VABA website: http://www.vermontisbookcountry.com/
Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/vermontisbookcountry/

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And here is a nice piece in the Rutland Herald about the fair: http://www.rutlandherald.com/article/20160328/THISJUSTIN/160329505/0/SEARCH

c2016 VABA

VABA 2014-15 brochure available online!

For more than thirty years, almost since its inception, the Vermont Antiquarian Booksellers Association has issued a printed guide to member shops. Available throughout the state at member bookshops, chamber of commerce displays and welcome centers, the VABA Brochure, as it is called, has been very popular with native Vermonters and tourists looking for collectible and hard-to-find books

The VABA Brochure is still being published on an annual basis. You can pick up a copy at any member bookshop, or have one mailed to you, free of charge, by contacting Joseph Trenn, the Book Shed, Lake Road, Benson VT 05731. Joe’s phone number is (802) 537-2190, and his email address is bookshed@shoreham.net.

We are pleased to include a PDF of the VABA Brochure here, on the official VABA website. Click on the link below to open and/or download the latest edition. The file will open in most browsers. If you have the Adobe PDF Reader on your computer, you can also right click on the above link and save the file to your computer for offline reading and printing.

http://www.vermontisbookcountry.com/pdfs/brochure.pdf

 

A Podcast on Books & Ephemera ~ with Ben Koenig of The Counrty Bookshop

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Ben Koenig of The Country Bookshop (in Plainfield Vermont), and one of the founding members of VABA, was recently on the Mark Johnson Show, talking about books and ephemera, and the joys of bookselling. You can listen to the 45-minute podcast that aired on March 20, 2014 here: http://blog.markjohnsonshow.net/2014/03/20/32014-ben-koenig-books-and-ephemera.aspx

The Mark Johnson show airs weekdays, 9-11 am on WDEV FM 96.1  AM 550.

c2014, VABA

The Future of Books

There has been a lot of discussion about the future of printed books. Since the advent of Amazon’s Kindle, the market for “e-books” has risen steadily, if not explosively. Some say that it will be the end of the printed book. I disagree.

The market for books is changing. But, the market is always changing. In today’s world, to operate your business the same as you did just six months ago may be the kiss of death for your livelihood. We booksellers today are faced with unprecedented market competition on one side and ever-rising overhead on the other side. What will happen?

I would like to offer up some of my ideas about where books and the business of selling them is headed. I have always been a great fan of Alvin Toffler and Thomas Friedman, two writers whom I would label as futurists. A futurist looks around the world as it is, then tries to predict what the world will become. Maybe I am a futurist of sorts too. So, here goes.

There will always be a demand for printed books. Especially those printed before the digital age, and especially those for whom there is a limited audience. Almost without exception, these will be scholarly works of nonfiction. Classic literature and popular works of any age will be available in a digitized format. Eventually, all books, fiction and nonfiction will be released in a digital version. However, there will still be room for the printed book. And there are still millions of printed books out there which will never be converted to a digital format.

Unless they rethink their business model. the large publishing houses will eventually wither and die for lack of demand for printed books. In order to survive, they will have to split their parent company apart into specialized houses serving a particular subject area. There will also be more companies specializing in better quality books. They will offer books with more durable bindings than is the case in today’s mass market world, where a book binding falls apart after one read. There will be more  better-quality books available. The mass-market paperbacks will still be be printed by the specialty houses, but in smaller runs.

There are some people like myself, for whom the feel of holding a book is part of the reading experience. Most of the younger folks who grow up using an electronic reading device may not be able to understand this, but I bet that there will be more and more converts going to the printed book for it’s feel of permanence, if nothing else. Yes, a printed book is, for most intents and purposes, permanent. Does anyone remember seeing Thomas Jefferson’s Kindle? And thankfully, Plato or Shakespeare did not save to a hard drive or to the internet cloud.

Technology itself is the Achilles Heel of the electronic book. Today, you may have purchased several hundred books for your electronic library. However, your reading device can only hold a few at a time. The rest are kept in that electronic limbo called the cloud. If you disable your reading device by dropping it, leave it on the roof of your car as you speed off to work, drop it in the water or fill it with sand at the beach, or the battery is drained, you will have what amounts to an expensive paperweight. And you will be unable to read any of your books until your device is repaired or replaced. True, a book will not emerge unscathed from such treatment either, but it will most likely survive in a readable condition. Last, but not least, your e-book is yours and yours alone. You cannot sell it to anyone else, and you cannot take it to a bookseller to sell or get trade-in credit. You are stuck with it. You can’t even donate it to the local library for a tax deduction.

The electronic reading devices themselves are still evolving. I have looked at some of the reviews for various devices and have read about the litany of problems of the devices themselves: Battery life, battery charging problems, problems connecting to the internet and other devices, delicate screens and other hardware as well as cranky software which cannot be repaired by the user. The e-reader is just one more device needing constant maintainance in today’s electronic world.

So, I think that even though digital books are a major presence in our world, booksellers should take heart. The printed book will outlast any form of electronic media, and is in no danger of extinction.

Vermont Antiquarian Booksellers Association ~ Spring Book & Ephemera Fair ~ March 23, 2014

Vermont Antiquarian Book & Ephemera Fair

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Attention all Book Lovers!

The VABA Spring Book Fair will be held on March 23rd from 10-4 at the Sheraton Hotel in South Burlington. Rare and unusual books, postcards, maps and ephemera will be available from 30+ New England dealers. From Nancy Drew to books from the 1600s, stock certificates from the 1800s to postcards from the 1900s, there is something for every interest and price range. Some local historical groups and bookbinders will have displays as well.

Admission is only $5.

For more information check out the VABA website:
http://www.VermontIsBookCountry.com

Details:

Sunday, March 23rd, 2014 from 10 am to 4 pm
Sheraton Hotel
870 Williston Road
South Burlington, Vermont

Directions: The Sheraton Hotel is just off Interstate 89, Exit 14W. Please call if you need more information: books [at] TheEloquentPage [dot] com or 802-527-7243.

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c2014 VABA